Sunday, 19 April 2015

Depression vs depressing

Primark Lion King Pyjamas

Lion King Pyjamas - Primark

Sometimes I wish there were two different words for the illness depression and the adjective 'depressing' to describe something. I think sometimes it can downplay the illness and create more stigma around it as people think that it's just a state of upset. Depression is not just being sad: it is being debilitated by your emotions; negative and irrational thoughts; not being able to physically do anything; a physical ache dragging you down. I am not necessarily crying my eyes out when I am suffering from my depression. Whereas people use the word 'depressing' for the smallest of things - a small blister on their foot; having to get up at 10am the next morning; maybe even not having enough pants to spare because they need to do a wash. They also say that they are feeling 'depressed' because of these 'depressing' things. I will put my hands up and say that I also use these words this way - I'm a culprit for saying it's depressing because the weather is bad outside. I just hope people realise that it is a completely separate thing from suffering from depression - and maybe think about their choice of words a little before stating that they are 'depressed'.

Anyway sorry for that little rant! I thought I would show you a photo of my pyjamas because they are what I have been living in today and they are just too cute. The Lion King is my favourite Disney film so I had to get them. Today has been fairly relaxing; I got up at lunch time and have been doing a little bit of work, scattered with a few viewings of Game of Thrones whilst eating an Easter egg the size of my head. I keep meaning to watch it and I felt like it was high time that I did as all of the series are currently on Sky (although I'm slightly regretting it now as I feel a little addicted and I have a lot of work to do over the next week...). But you need some time off work so this will be mine for the next few days! I also spoke to my dad this evening and he is very scared about our sky dive in 27 days' time (!!) - he said he's going to make sure he takes a spare pair of pants with him.
Close your eyes and imagine the best version of you possible. That's who you really are, let go of any part of you that doesn't believe it.
              - C. Assaad




PS Please donate towards my sponsored skydive for Mind here, or text MIHV99 £1 to 70070 - thank you for your support!

11 comments:

  1. I love this post and it's something I've been thinking about a lot recently too. We shouldn't use these terms because they just get overused until the become meaningless. I think I saw someone say 'I'm so OCD' and I was just thinking that you really have no idea...
    Also love the pjs! xx

    Sam | Samantha Betteridge

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    1. Thank you Sam! Yeah I think they are so overused that sometimes people forget about the real reason behind them. I just wish people would really think about what they are saying! xx

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  2. Good luck on your skydive Hannah!
    What you say about negative and irrational thoughts/emotions is really important, breaking the negative thoughts/feelings/actions cycle is critical to recovering from the illness. In my experience learning to put a positive 'spin' on things is the first step to a life free from depression. After reading the destroy depression system by James Gordon, I became ever-mindful of my thoughts and as a result managed to break free from the negativity cycle - changing my diet and exercising regularly also had a massive effect on my mental well-being.
    ps - Game of Thrones is awesome!

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    1. Thank you very much! I'm really glad that you have found some ways to help your depression - I think mindfulness is a really helpful tool :) xx

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  3. Those pyjamas are fabulous!! I'm always in need of new pjs.

    I don't think people stop to consider what 'depressing' means. I think of it as more flattening rather than necessarily being 'sad' and that's certainly how depression felt to me at times. I can cope with sad, but it was the days where I couldn't make myself feel emotion that were hardest.

    I try not to be too strict about using 'PC' language... Common things like "that's so OCD" or "its so depressing" or even "that's mental" are phrases that do get used a lot. If it feels particularly inappropriate I might question someone's use of a word, but I try not to get too caught up in it all! I did do a really interesting project on use of the word 'schizophrenia' though. Honestly, if you ever want to do a project at med school that basically makes it ok to watch TV and read the daily mail online, it's inappropriate use of mental health related words! There was a study that found a reasonably large proportion of US newspapers used "schizophrenic" to describe changeable things like the weather...
    Jennifer x
    Ginevrella | Lifestyle Blog

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    1. Thanks Jenny! Yes definitely, depression is so much more than just sadness. I think it's okay that people use the terms, I just really wish they would think about them a little more and what it may mean to someone that actually suffers with a mental illness. Wow that sounds really interesting! That's crazy xx

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  4. I really does annoy me when people say they are 'depressed' when actually there are not. There is very much differnece between feeling sad, and literally feeling numb and never seeing the light. I love this post, and those PJs are fab!

    Kirsty xx

    kirstyralph.co.uk

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    1. Yes there is definitely a huge difference. Thank you Kirsty! :) xx

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  5. That's exactly what needs to be said, Hannah. Depression must never be trivialized. It must be given a proper understanding, as it's not only a spur of the moment, but is a sustained condition, which has roots deep into our own personal history and experience. That's why there are therapies available for people who are coping with such conditions. We should have a proper sense of perspective about this, so that we can truly see who needs our help.

    Sabra Hoffmann @ Stark Behavioral Health

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